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wildling

wildling WAHYLD-ling  , noun;

1. a wild plant, flower, or animal.

Quotes:

It is well to remember that when a fruit tree has its vital power weakened and the necessities of culture results in this, the tree is much more liable to disease, than when it is as healthy as a wildling in a place where the art of the fruit grower has never been calledinto play.
 Edited by Thomas Meehan, The Gardener’s Monthlyand Horticulturist 1879
This little wildling  that looked like a hill pony made the fastest horse Albrin had bred seem a plodding workhorse in comparison.
 Patricia Briggs, The Hob’s Bargain 2001
Origin:
Wildling joins the word wild"living in a state of nature,” with -lingan Old English suffix meaning "a person or thing concerned with.” It entered English in the mid-1800s.

hippophile

hippophile \ HIP-uh-fahyl, -fil  , noun;

1. one who loves horses

Quotes:
Hippophiles  could be temperamental. MonsieurPoitevin had noticed this. Horses themselves werestubborn and impulsive and, over time, an exchange ofcharacter could occur between rider and mount.
 Julia O’Faolain, The Judas Cloth 1992
Some say a certain hippophile  Earl must be at leasthalf in love with Mrs D—r, to play his part so well atthe R-ch—d House Theatre.
 Emma Donoghue, Life Mask 2004
Origin:
Hippophile  comes from the Greek híppos  meaning"horse" and -philos  meaning "dear" or "beloved." Thisterm entered English in the mid-1800s.

cognizant

cognizant \KOG-nuh-zuhnt, KON-uh-, adjective:

1. having cognizance; aware (usually followed by of ): He was cognizant of the difficulty.
2. having legal cognizance.

A Frenchman was cognizant of the murder. It is possible—indeed it is far more than probable—that he was innocent of all participation in the bloody transaction which took place.
— Edgar Allan Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” 1841
I don’t really think you’ve been as cognizant of that fact in the past as you might have been.
— Stanley Elkin, Boswell: A Modern Comedy, 1964

Cognizant is modern construction, dating from the early 1800s. It is likely formed from the term cognizance.

wayfarer

wayfarer \WEY-fair-er, noun:

a traveler, especially on foot.

But as you passed along these horrible records, in an hour’s time destined to be obliterated by the feet of thousands and thousands of wayfarers, you were not left unassailed by the clamorous petitions of the more urgent applicants for charity.
— Herman Melville, Redburn: His First Voyage, 1849
…it is not inconceivable that, for all his sorrowful thoughts, our botanist, with his trained observation, his habit of looking at little things upon the ground, would be the one to see and pick up the coin that has fallen from some wayfarer’s pocket.
— H. G. Wells, A Modern Utopia, 1905

Wayfarer is the modern form of the Middle English weyfarere. It’s been used in English since the 1400s.

cockalorum

cockalorum \kok-uh-LAWR-uhm, -LOHR-, noun:

a self-important little man.

Meantime, let him be foolish! “I suppose he thinks he’s the grand high cockalorum!” she told herself, chuckling.
— Margaret Wade Campbell Deland, The Iron Woman, 1911
His mother was dead and he could write about her: a young woman, a girl, really, with Sid, who was just a child, and Rose, who was even younger, emigrating from an inhospitable Russian countryside with that young cockalorum of a husband—good God, was he that way even then?—to live in this alien land and die before she was fifty.
— Joseph Heller, Good as Gold, 1979

This mock Latin term is a derivative of cock, meaning “a male chicken.” It came to English in the early 1700s.

fusty

fusty \FUHS-tee, adjective:

1. old-fashioned or out-of-date, as architecture, furnishings, or the like: They still live in that fusty, gingerbread house.
2. having a stale smell; moldy; musty: fusty rooms that were in need of a good airing.
3. stubbornly conservative or old-fashioned; fogyish.

It seemed somewhat fusty with its plush gold and red trimmings and ornate furniture, all of it so completely devoid of human activity.
— Curtis Gillespie, Playing Through: A Year of Life and Links Along the Scottish Coast, 2002
She entered, and without further talk went up a steep, fusty stair and knocked at a door on a tiny landing.
— Thomas Burke, Twinkletoes, 1926

Fusty can be traced back to the Latin fustis meaning “staff, stick of wood.” It entered English in the 1390s.

columbine

columbine \KOL-uhm-bahyn, -bin, adjective:

1. dovelike; dove-colored.
2. of a dove.

For it is not possible to join serpentine wisdom with columbine innocency, except men know exactly all the conditions of the serpent: his baseness and going upon his belly, his volubility and lubricity, his envy and sting, and the rest; that is, all forms and natures of evil …
— Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning, 1605
Com forth now with thyne eyen columbyn. / How fairer been thy brestes than is wyn.
— Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Merchant’s Tale,” The Canterbury Tales, 1387–1400

Columbine is derived from the Latin columba meaning “dove.” The columbine flower was so named because of its resemblance to a cluster of doves.

sciamachy

sciamachy \sahy-AM-uh-kee, noun:

an act or instance of fighting a shadow or an imaginary enemy.

No, our man walks out of choice, and walks because only on foot can he engage in the sciamachy essential to his trade: fencing with the shadows of hat brims, gun muzzles and arms flung across brickwork by the beams of Kliegs.
— Will Self, Walking to Hollywood: Memories of Before the Fall, 2010
It further tends to leave the self in disarray, without an orientation. And it risks remaining wastefully engaged in psychological sciamachy – a struggle with shadows or imaginary enemies.
— Eric Sigg, The American T.S. Eliot: A Study of the Early Writings, 1989

Sciamachy is derived from the Greek skiamakhia, which translates literally to “fighting in the shade,” giving name to the practice in ancient Greece of instructors teaching in shaded public places, such as porches and groves.

toothsome

toothsome \TOOTH-suhm, adjective:

1. pleasing to the taste; palatable: a toothsome dish.
2. pleasing or desirable, as fame or power.
3. voluptuous; sexually alluring: a toothsome blonde.

It was filled with friandises, with luscious and toothsome bits—the finest of fruits, pates, a rare bottle or two, delicious syrups, and bonbons in abundance.
— Kate Chopin, The Awakening, 1899
Strictly judged, most modern poems are but larger or smaller lumps of sugar, or slices of toothsome sweet cake—even the banqueters dwelling on those glucose flavors as a main part of the dish.
— Walt Whitman, “An Old Man’s Rejoinder,” 1890

Toothsome entered English in the 1560, joining the word tooth, denoting “sense, liking,” with the adjective-forming suffix –some.

moiety

moiety \MOI-i-tee, noun:

1. a half.
2. an indefinite portion, part, or share.
3. Anthropology. one of two units into which a tribe or community is divided on the basis of unilineal descent.

Tom divided the cake and Becky ate with good appetite, while Tom nibbled at his moiety.
— Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876
Poor Federigo, although his necessity was extreme and his grief great, remembering his former inordinate expenses, a moiety whereof would now have stood him in some stead, yet he had a heart as free and forward as ever, not a jot dejected in his mind, though utterly overthrown by fortune.
— Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375), “The Falcon,” Little Masterpieces of Fiction, 1905

Moiety comes from Old French meitiet, from Late Latin medietas, from Latin medius, “middle.”

wildling

wildling WAHYLD-ling  , noun;

1. a wild plant, flower, or animal.

Quotes:

It is well to remember that when a fruit tree has its vital power weakened and the necessities of culture results in this, the tree is much more liable to disease, than when it is as healthy as a wildling in a place where the art of the fruit grower has never been calledinto play.
 Edited by Thomas Meehan, The Gardener’s Monthlyand Horticulturist 1879
This little wildling  that looked like a hill pony made the fastest horse Albrin had bred seem a plodding workhorse in comparison.
 Patricia Briggs, The Hob’s Bargain 2001
Origin:
Wildling joins the word wild"living in a state of nature,” with -lingan Old English suffix meaning "a person or thing concerned with.” It entered English in the mid-1800s.

hippophile

hippophile \ HIP-uh-fahyl, -fil  , noun;

1. one who loves horses

Quotes:
Hippophiles  could be temperamental. MonsieurPoitevin had noticed this. Horses themselves werestubborn and impulsive and, over time, an exchange ofcharacter could occur between rider and mount.
 Julia O’Faolain, The Judas Cloth 1992
Some say a certain hippophile  Earl must be at leasthalf in love with Mrs D—r, to play his part so well atthe R-ch—d House Theatre.
 Emma Donoghue, Life Mask 2004
Origin:
Hippophile  comes from the Greek híppos  meaning"horse" and -philos  meaning "dear" or "beloved." Thisterm entered English in the mid-1800s.

cognizant

cognizant \KOG-nuh-zuhnt, KON-uh-, adjective:

1. having cognizance; aware (usually followed by of ): He was cognizant of the difficulty.
2. having legal cognizance.

A Frenchman was cognizant of the murder. It is possible—indeed it is far more than probable—that he was innocent of all participation in the bloody transaction which took place.
— Edgar Allan Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” 1841
I don’t really think you’ve been as cognizant of that fact in the past as you might have been.
— Stanley Elkin, Boswell: A Modern Comedy, 1964

Cognizant is modern construction, dating from the early 1800s. It is likely formed from the term cognizance.

wayfarer

wayfarer \WEY-fair-er, noun:

a traveler, especially on foot.

But as you passed along these horrible records, in an hour’s time destined to be obliterated by the feet of thousands and thousands of wayfarers, you were not left unassailed by the clamorous petitions of the more urgent applicants for charity.
— Herman Melville, Redburn: His First Voyage, 1849
…it is not inconceivable that, for all his sorrowful thoughts, our botanist, with his trained observation, his habit of looking at little things upon the ground, would be the one to see and pick up the coin that has fallen from some wayfarer’s pocket.
— H. G. Wells, A Modern Utopia, 1905

Wayfarer is the modern form of the Middle English weyfarere. It’s been used in English since the 1400s.

cockalorum

cockalorum \kok-uh-LAWR-uhm, -LOHR-, noun:

a self-important little man.

Meantime, let him be foolish! “I suppose he thinks he’s the grand high cockalorum!” she told herself, chuckling.
— Margaret Wade Campbell Deland, The Iron Woman, 1911
His mother was dead and he could write about her: a young woman, a girl, really, with Sid, who was just a child, and Rose, who was even younger, emigrating from an inhospitable Russian countryside with that young cockalorum of a husband—good God, was he that way even then?—to live in this alien land and die before she was fifty.
— Joseph Heller, Good as Gold, 1979

This mock Latin term is a derivative of cock, meaning “a male chicken.” It came to English in the early 1700s.

fusty

fusty \FUHS-tee, adjective:

1. old-fashioned or out-of-date, as architecture, furnishings, or the like: They still live in that fusty, gingerbread house.
2. having a stale smell; moldy; musty: fusty rooms that were in need of a good airing.
3. stubbornly conservative or old-fashioned; fogyish.

It seemed somewhat fusty with its plush gold and red trimmings and ornate furniture, all of it so completely devoid of human activity.
— Curtis Gillespie, Playing Through: A Year of Life and Links Along the Scottish Coast, 2002
She entered, and without further talk went up a steep, fusty stair and knocked at a door on a tiny landing.
— Thomas Burke, Twinkletoes, 1926

Fusty can be traced back to the Latin fustis meaning “staff, stick of wood.” It entered English in the 1390s.

columbine

columbine \KOL-uhm-bahyn, -bin, adjective:

1. dovelike; dove-colored.
2. of a dove.

For it is not possible to join serpentine wisdom with columbine innocency, except men know exactly all the conditions of the serpent: his baseness and going upon his belly, his volubility and lubricity, his envy and sting, and the rest; that is, all forms and natures of evil …
— Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning, 1605
Com forth now with thyne eyen columbyn. / How fairer been thy brestes than is wyn.
— Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Merchant’s Tale,” The Canterbury Tales, 1387–1400

Columbine is derived from the Latin columba meaning “dove.” The columbine flower was so named because of its resemblance to a cluster of doves.

sciamachy

sciamachy \sahy-AM-uh-kee, noun:

an act or instance of fighting a shadow or an imaginary enemy.

No, our man walks out of choice, and walks because only on foot can he engage in the sciamachy essential to his trade: fencing with the shadows of hat brims, gun muzzles and arms flung across brickwork by the beams of Kliegs.
— Will Self, Walking to Hollywood: Memories of Before the Fall, 2010
It further tends to leave the self in disarray, without an orientation. And it risks remaining wastefully engaged in psychological sciamachy – a struggle with shadows or imaginary enemies.
— Eric Sigg, The American T.S. Eliot: A Study of the Early Writings, 1989

Sciamachy is derived from the Greek skiamakhia, which translates literally to “fighting in the shade,” giving name to the practice in ancient Greece of instructors teaching in shaded public places, such as porches and groves.

toothsome

toothsome \TOOTH-suhm, adjective:

1. pleasing to the taste; palatable: a toothsome dish.
2. pleasing or desirable, as fame or power.
3. voluptuous; sexually alluring: a toothsome blonde.

It was filled with friandises, with luscious and toothsome bits—the finest of fruits, pates, a rare bottle or two, delicious syrups, and bonbons in abundance.
— Kate Chopin, The Awakening, 1899
Strictly judged, most modern poems are but larger or smaller lumps of sugar, or slices of toothsome sweet cake—even the banqueters dwelling on those glucose flavors as a main part of the dish.
— Walt Whitman, “An Old Man’s Rejoinder,” 1890

Toothsome entered English in the 1560, joining the word tooth, denoting “sense, liking,” with the adjective-forming suffix –some.

moiety

moiety \MOI-i-tee, noun:

1. a half.
2. an indefinite portion, part, or share.
3. Anthropology. one of two units into which a tribe or community is divided on the basis of unilineal descent.

Tom divided the cake and Becky ate with good appetite, while Tom nibbled at his moiety.
— Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876
Poor Federigo, although his necessity was extreme and his grief great, remembering his former inordinate expenses, a moiety whereof would now have stood him in some stead, yet he had a heart as free and forward as ever, not a jot dejected in his mind, though utterly overthrown by fortune.
— Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375), “The Falcon,” Little Masterpieces of Fiction, 1905

Moiety comes from Old French meitiet, from Late Latin medietas, from Latin medius, “middle.”

wildling
hippophile
cognizant
wayfarer
cockalorum
fusty
columbine
sciamachy
toothsome
moiety

About:

All these words come from Dictionary.com that graciously e-mails me words daily to broaden my vocabulary, so all credit goes to them! I simply save the ones I like best and post them here. <3

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